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States Seek to Ease Restrictions on Initial Licensure During State of Emergency

The ADEA Advocate reports that three states have eased restrictions on initial licensure for students graduating from dental or dental hygiene programs due to the cancellation of clinical examinations.

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The ADEA Advocate reports that three states have eased restrictions on initial licensure for students graduating from dental or dental hygiene programs due to the cancellation of clinical examinations. At presstime, several additional states have taken action that could open the door for boards of dentistry to modify initial licensure rules.

 In Oklahoma, an executive order issued by Gov. J. Kevin Stitt (R) requires all state agencies with licensing authority over medical professionals to promulgate rules that increase opportunities for licensure for students and recent graduates who are not yet fully licensed to practice. Any license issued pursuant to emergency rules is valid while the executive order is in effect.

 An executive order issued by California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) allows the director of the state’s Department of Consumer Affairs, for the duration of the declared state of emergency, to waive any of the professional licensing requirements and amend scopes of practice. Under the executive order, professional licensing requirements include—but are not limited to—the examination, education, experience and training requirements necessary to obtain and maintain licensure, and requirements governing the practice and permissible activities for licensees.

 In Vermont, Gov. Phil Scott (R) signed a bill that allows licensing boards to grant temporary licenses to graduates of approved education programs during a period when licensing examinations are not reasonably available. Temporary licenses granted under these conditions would authorize practice for up to 90 days and could be reissued by the board, if the declared state of emergency continues longer than 90 days.

 Dental boards in each of these states will still need to establish rules or policies that change processes for initial licensure in these states.

Read ADEA’s full report at: adea.informz.net

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